Mosel Wine Primer

This is an interesting little video for wine novices such as myself as it is a number of local producers talking us through the Mosel wines and how they get their unique character.

I like the way the one guy towards the end says he drinks a bottle a night and his doctor tells him he is in perfect health. That is clearly where I have been going wrong all these years!

Zeller Lange Tafel (Zell Long Table)

On Saturday 20th July from 11am, the 2018 Zell Long Table (”Zeller Lange Tafel”) kicks off.

As the name suggests, a 400 metre long table runs the entire length of Balduinstraße (which is the main shopping street of the town) at which local cafes, bars, restaurants and even shops serve up various food specialities and of course copious amounts of local wine. Continue reading “Zeller Lange Tafel (Zell Long Table)”

2005 Fritz Haag Brauneberger Juffer Sonnenuhr Riesling Auslese #6, 7.5% — sweetworldwines

This wine is still a clear and bright pale straw colour, with voluminous aromas of petroleum, kiwi-fruit, green melon, lime, some waxiness, and a touch of camphor too. The palate is poised and effortless, concentrated , with more lemon and light tropical flavours added to the mix. Its the kind of wine that puts me […]

via 2005 Fritz Haag Brauneberger Juffer Sonnenuhr Riesling Auslese #6, 7.5% — sweetworldwines

Mosel Regional Cuisine – Winzerteller

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People often ask me what typical regional cuisine is in the Mosel valley, but it is a very hard question to answer. What does seem to pop up regularly on menus in the eateries along the river is the “Winzerteller” which literally translates to “Vintner’s plate”. It’s not unique to the region, as I know such things are popular in other states such as Bavaria (where it is called “Brotzeit”), but it is the perfect accompaniment to the local Riesling wine.

As you can see, it is basically just a wooden platter with a selection of meats, cheese or both. The meats usually include cured ham and sliced sausage – often homemade – such as black pudding (“Blutwurst”) and liver sausage “Leberwurst”).

The platter in the picture is from a restaurant in Zell (I will publish the name when I remember it!) and includes cured ham and sausage made from local wild boar (“Wildschwein”). It is one of my favourite meals.

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