“Festlicher Weinpudding” – Festive Wine Pudding

Here is another intriguing recipe using Riesling (or any other) wine, and despite it being called “festive” there is no reason why it cannot be enjoyed at any time.

Being a useless cook myself, I have to admit that I have not attempted to make this one yet, but if anyone does I would love to hear if it was a success!

You will need:

  • 750 ml Riesling or other white wine
  • 5 eggs, separated
  • 5 tablespoons sugar
  • 3 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1 sachet vanilla sugar
  • 50 grams ground almonds
  • Cinnamon and sugar to finish

Briskly beat the wine with the egg yolks, sugar, vanilla sugar and starch over a gentle heat until thickened – do not overheat as it will scramble! Beat the egg white until stiff and fold in the almonds.

Pour the egg yolk mixture into a greased baking dish and top with the egg white mixture. Bake for about 20 minutes at 200 ° C. Sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar.

(Adapted from the recipe the German imosel website which can be found here).

Riesling Glühwein

Christmas is rapidly approaching now and those of us living in Germany will no doubt have already had the pleasure of sampling the famous “Glühwein” at one of the multitude of Christmas Markets that start in late November and go on right up until Christmas Eve or even into the New Year.

Traditionally, Glühwein is made from red wine, but of course, Mosel wine is predominantly white. It would be a bit of an insult to the local wine producers not to attempt to make some using the local plonk, so I reproduce here a recipe I found on the German cooking website http://www.kochbar.de/. It is the best translation from German to English I could manage, but I think it is reasonably accurate.

Weißer Glühwein (Mulled White Wine)

Ingredients:

  • 600 ml dry white wine
  • 150 ml Vodka
  • One orange
  • Five cloves
  • Two cinnamon sticks
  • Half teaspoon cardamom seeds
  • Three tablespoons of honey
  • Freshly grated nutmeg to taste
  • Lemon slices, to serve.

Slice the orange and throw into a saucepan along with all the other ingredients. Cover and heat gently but do not boil for at least ten minutes (if you boil it you will evaporate off the alcohol and we don’t want that now do we?). Taste and add more honey if necessary. Serve hot in heat-resistant glasses garnished with a light sprinkling of cinnamon, one clove and a slice of lemon.

Please note this is just one variation on a theme – the aforementioned website has numerous other recipes for mulled white wine, so feel free to experiment to come up different spice and citrus combinations to make your own personalised Christmas drink!

Mosel musings (Re-blog from sweetworldwines)

Its not easy to take notes when on holidays, and with limited access to the internet. A few thoughts follow. Photos may be added later. There are dozens of wineries in Bernkastel, and hundreds in the surrounding areas. Most are small, so the wines are not exported. Insider knowledge is needed to determine makers of […]

Cvia Mosel musings — sweetworldwines

Adult Ice Cream

Ice cream as we all know comes in a dazzling array of flavours ranging from the traditional through the exotic to the downright weird. However, on a trip to Cochem I tried ice cream – made from local wine.

Initially I expected it to be just wine flavoured ice cream, but the first lick proved it indeed was made from the real thing and four scoops later I honestly could feel the effects! Maybe that was just a placebo effect, as surely ice cream cannot be alcoholic?

Anyway, all I can say is if you have a sweet tooth and love refreshing ice cream as opposed to the rich creamy varieties, get yourself over to Cochem and give it a try. Unfortunately I did not get the name of the particular parlour where I had it, but it was right in the historic centre and I saw other places selling it. You can probably get it in other towns along the river too, although I have struggled to find it in Zell.

German Wine Terms Pronunciation

For those of you who might be struggling, here is a very useful little video produced by the Deutsches Weininstitut (German Wine Institute) on how to pronounce the various German wine terms and their meanings:

To see their website which has a host of information on German wines in general (in English) click here.

Mosel Riesling: Like the Juice of Crushed Slate

Interesting. I would never have thought of the slate acting as a kind of natural storage heater for the vines.

The Finest Wines Available To Humanity

Not that you can get juice from crushed slate, but the image definitely evokes the focused, flinty character of rieslings from the Mosel.

In this most northerly of wine regions (it’s at 50° latitude; the latitudinal range for wine growing is 28°-50°) the bits of slate that litter the vineyards store the sun’s heat, transferring the energy to vines which would otherwise lose the will during the cold night hours. The Mosel river itself also helps to nourish the vines, reflecting the sun on to the slopes and providing that extra bit of warmth that encourages the vines along.

And what about those slopes:

Bremmer Calmont

‘Steep’ barely covers it. Look across the river at certain vineyard blocks and they look vertical . The Bremmer Calmont (Bremm is the town, Calmont the vineyard. This is a naming system you will come to recognise if you drink Mosel wines) vineyard on the bow of the river between Trier and Koblenz is the steepest in…

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Wein Nachts Markt in Traben Trarbach

Germany is famous for its Christmas markets, and virtually every town has one. The problem is, they can be a bit ‘samey’ if you know what I mean. But there are plenty with an unusual twist, and I think one of the most notable and romantic has to be the  Traben-Trarbach”Mosel-Wein-Nachts-Markt” which literally mean “Wine Nights Market”, a clever play on “Weihnachtsmarkt”, the German word for Christmas Market.

In keeping with the wine heritage of the town, this event offers markets in some enormous old vaulted cellars which are decked out with stalls offering a big variety of traditional crafts, edible treats and of course local plonk. Also on offer is an ice skating rink (outdoor, not in a cellar!) plus an extensive entertainment programme.

The markets are open from Friday through Sunday between 27th November to 20th December, and daily from 21st December to 3rd January, although 24th, 25th and 31st December are closed for obvious reasons. Opening times for the market are 11am to 9pm, and 3pm to 8pm for the skating rink except at weekends when the fun starts at 11am.

Traben-Trabach is very accessible, being located on the Mosel between Koblenz and Trier. A shuttle bus service from some of the other towns along the river is available. For those of you in the UK, Ryanair offers cheap flights from Stansted (and Edinburgh I believe but I need to check) to Frankfurt Hahn regional airport which is only about 40 minutes away from Traben-Trarbach, so there is no reason not to spend a weekend in the region and experience the real German Christmas spirit.

You can find out more by clicking here for the website but you may have to run it through Google Translate as it is only in German. Clicking here will give you the brochure which includes a map of the various attractions, programme for the entertainment and more. Alternatively, the Tourist Information office in the town will be able to help.

Mosel Riesling – the current state of play

Check out this rather interesting blog post by w1ngblog on their wine tasting trip to Bernkastel Kues. I cannot help but wonder how they managed to remain upright after trying fifty different wines!

Source: Mosel Riesling – the current state of play

Ayler Kupp, Riesling Auslese, 2012, Bischöfliche Weingüter Trier

Nice review of a from Trier on the Wine and Food blog.

Wine and Food

Ayler Kupp, Riesling Auslese, 2012, Bischöfliche Weingüter Trier, White-wine from Germany

6 points

WP_20150522_005The first nip is a different note than many other Riesling from this area which is very close to the famous vineyard Scharzhofberg at the river Saar. It is a little bit tart and, it appears creamier and has more petrol. This Riesling is perhaps also a little bit less mineral although the soil is shist. Due to a bit more modest mineralitiy there is a different balance among Riesling’s typical fruitiness and freshness. The fruits are less citron but a bit more mature as apple and gooseberry but also some exotic flavors. The wine sparkles a bit on one tongue which is refreshing and has a very long reverberation. Although it is an Auslese this wine is dry and even a little bit fumy if you can say so.

The wine has a typical color of Riesling:…

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Wine Primer

This is an interesting little video for wine novices such as myself as it is a number of local producers talking us through the Mosel wines and how they get their unique character.

I like the way the one guy towards the end says he drinks a bottle a night and his doctor tells him he is in perfect health. That is clearly where I have been going wrong all these years!