Mosel Wine Primer

This is an interesting little video for wine novices such as myself as it is a number of local producers talking us through the Mosel wines and how they get their unique character.

I like the way the one guy towards the end says he drinks a bottle a night and his doctor tells him he is in perfect health. That is clearly where I have been going wrong all these years!

2005 Fritz Haag Brauneberger Juffer Sonnenuhr Riesling Auslese #6, 7.5% — sweetworldwines

This wine is still a clear and bright pale straw colour, with voluminous aromas of petroleum, kiwi-fruit, green melon, lime, some waxiness, and a touch of camphor too. The palate is poised and effortless, concentrated , with more lemon and light tropical flavours added to the mix. Its the kind of wine that puts me […]

via 2005 Fritz Haag Brauneberger Juffer Sonnenuhr Riesling Auslese #6, 7.5% — sweetworldwines

Mosel Riesling: Like the Juice of Crushed Slate

Interesting. I would never have thought of the slate acting as a kind of natural storage heater for the vines.

The Finest Wines Available To Humanity

Not that you can get juice from crushed slate, but the image definitely evokes the focused, flinty character of rieslings from the Mosel.

In this most northerly of wine regions (it’s at 50° latitude; the latitudinal range for wine growing is 28°-50°) the bits of slate that litter the vineyards store the sun’s heat, transferring the energy to vines which would otherwise lose the will during the cold night hours. The Mosel river itself also helps to nourish the vines, reflecting the sun on to the slopes and providing that extra bit of warmth that encourages the vines along.

And what about those slopes:

Bremmer Calmont

‘Steep’ barely covers it. Look across the river at certain vineyard blocks and they look vertical . The Bremmer Calmont (Bremm is the town, Calmont the vineyard. This is a naming system you will come to recognise if you drink Mosel wines) vineyard on the bow of the river between Trier and Koblenz is the steepest in…

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Wein Nachts Markt in Traben Trarbach

Germany is famous for its Christmas markets, and virtually every town has one. The problem is, they can be a bit ‘samey’ if you know what I mean. But there are plenty with an unusual twist, and I think one of the most notable and romantic has to be the  Traben-Trarbach”Mosel-Wein-Nachts-Markt” which literally mean “Wine Nights Market”, a clever play on “Weihnachtsmarkt”, the German word for Christmas Market.

In keeping with the wine heritage of the town, this event offers markets in some enormous old vaulted cellars which are decked out with stalls offering a big variety of traditional crafts, edible treats and of course local plonk. Also on offer is an ice skating rink (outdoor, not in a cellar!) plus an extensive entertainment programme.

The markets are open from Friday through Sunday between 27th November to 20th December, and daily from 21st December to 3rd January, although 24th, 25th and 31st December are closed for obvious reasons. Opening times for the market are 11am to 9pm, and 3pm to 8pm for the skating rink except at weekends when the fun starts at 11am.

Traben-Trabach is very accessible, being located on the Mosel between Koblenz and Trier. A shuttle bus service from some of the other towns along the river is available. For those of you in the UK, Ryanair offers cheap flights from Stansted (and Edinburgh I believe but I need to check) to Frankfurt Hahn regional airport which is only about 40 minutes away from Traben-Trarbach, so there is no reason not to spend a weekend in the region and experience the real German Christmas spirit.

You can find out more by clicking here for the website but you may have to run it through Google Translate as it is only in German. Clicking here will give you the brochure which includes a map of the various attractions, programme for the entertainment and more. Alternatively, the Tourist Information office in the town will be able to help.

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