Zeller Lange Tafel (Zell Long Table)

On Saturday 20th July from 11am, the 2018 Zell Long Table (”Zeller Lange Tafel”) kicks off.

As the name suggests, a 400 metre long table runs the entire length of Balduinstraße (which is the main shopping street of the town) at which local cafes, bars, restaurants and even shops serve up various food specialities and of course copious amounts of local wine.

A host of events take place throughout the day. Of course, most will be in German, but the people are friendly and the atmosphere is great. The programme is as follows:

11am – Official opening.

12am – Tour for children followed by spaghetti making and painting competition. Meeting point is the Schwartze Katz fountain. Ends at around 2pm.

5pm & 7pm – Performances of the play ”Zeller Schwarze Katz” by the laymen of the town hall. The play (in German but still entertaining) tells the story of how the town’s wine was named.

10pm – Lantern walk and cellar tour of the Zeller Kelterhaus. Meeting point at the Schwartze Katz fountain.

There will also be live and disco music.

Knight’s Meal at Reichsburg, Cochem

The impressive Reichsburg medieval fortress in Cochem has several activities over the year, one of the most popular being the Knight’s Meal.

As the name suggests, you are served medieval style food by people in costume from the period, and the entertainment also harks from that era. Of course, meat features on the menu, but vegetarians are not forgotten as a meatless version of the meal is available.

The event takes place several times a month and most are in German with English translation sheets provided. They do hold a limited number in English, the next being on Saturday 1st September 2018 and one on Friday 21st September 2018.

The meal lasts around four hours and costs €49 for adults and €24.50 for children aged 6 to 17 years. Be prepared to share a table with others – not only is that very medieval, but it is also common in parts of Germany and does make for a very social experience.

Reservation is essential as the event sells out quickly. Full details including a menu, availability chart and booking form are available here.

 

German Wine Terms Pronunciation

For those of you who might be struggling, here is a very useful little video produced by the Deutsches Weininstitut (German Wine Institute) on how to pronounce the various German wine terms and their meanings:

 

To see their website which has a host of information on German wines in general (in English) click here.

2005 Fritz Haag Brauneberger Juffer Sonnenuhr Riesling Auslese #6, 7.5% — sweetworldwines

This wine is still a clear and bright pale straw colour, with voluminous aromas of petroleum, kiwi-fruit, green melon, lime, some waxiness, and a touch of camphor too. The palate is poised and effortless, concentrated , with more lemon and light tropical flavours added to the mix. Its the kind of wine that puts me […]

via 2005 Fritz Haag Brauneberger Juffer Sonnenuhr Riesling Auslese #6, 7.5% — sweetworldwines

Mosel Regional Cuisine – Winzerteller

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People often ask me what typical regional cuisine is in the Mosel valley, but it is a very hard question to answer. What does seem to pop up regularly on menus in the eateries along the river is the “Winzerteller” which literally translates to “Vintner’s plate”. It’s not unique to the region, as I know such things are popular in other states such as Bavaria (where it is called “Brotzeit”), but it is the perfect accompaniment to the local Riesling wine.

As you can see, it is basically just a wooden platter with a selection of meats, cheese or both. The meats usually include cured ham and sliced sausage – often homemade – such as black pudding (“Blutwurst”) and liver sausage “Leberwurst”).

The platter in the picture is from a restaurant in Zell (I will publish the name when I remember it!) and includes cured ham and sausage made from local wild boar (“Wildschwein”). It is one of my favourite meals.

Fried Mosel Eel

For those of you interested in Mosel regional cooking, here is a recipe which may not appeal to everyone but I personally quite like – fried eel. Eel is one of those foods that people (Cockneys excepted) unfairly dismiss without even trying, but I say if you ever get the chance, give it a whirl.

Ingredients (German names of ingredients are also shown):

  • 500 g Eel (“Aal”)
  • 1 Onion (“Zwiebel”)
  • Salt and pepper
  • Fish seasoning (“Fischgewürz”)
  • 125 g Flour (“Mehl”)
  • 1 Egg (“Ei”)
  • 200 ml Wine (white is best. Water or beer could be used instead)
  • Oil for frying

Preparation:

Take the eel, cut into portions and season with a little salt. Poach the eel pieces in boiling water into which some fish spice and pepper have been added to taste. Whilst the eel is cooking, prepare a batter by whisking together the flour, egg, wine and two teaspoons of the oil. When the fish has cooked for 30 minutes, remove from the cooking liquid, drain thoroughly and dip in the batter. Finally, fry the battered eel pieces in oil until golden brown. Drain on kitchen paper and serve.

(Recipe adapted from the recipe section of the Mosel.de website)

Christmas Markets In The Mosel Region

We’ve had some snow so everything is starting to feel a little more festive, which is great news for those planning on attending one of the famous German Christmas markets which are now well underway. For those of us living in or visiting the Mosel valley, the unique combination of the magical market atmosphere coupled with picturesque surroundings really is unbeatable.

So, wrap up nice and warm and head off to indulge in a glass or two of the ubiquitous “Glühwein” (warm mulled wine) or “Eierlikor” (eggnog) whilst browsing the multitudes of stalls selling crafts, trinkets, sweets and a whole host of other traditional and not-so-traditional Christmas goods.

Most towns big and small have at least one market, some lasting just for a few days and others for much longer. You can find a selection of those that take place in and around the area by clicking here, or for those happy to take a day trip a little further afield, try here.

Riesling Glühwein

Christmas is rapidly approaching now and those of us living in Germany will no doubt have already had the pleasure of sampling the famous “Glühwein” at one of the multitudes of Christmas Markets that start in late November and go on right up until Christmas Eve or even into the New Year.

Traditionally, Glühwein is made from red wine, but of course, Mosel wine is predominantly white. It would be a bit of an insult to the local wine producers not to attempt to make some using the local plonk, so I reproduce here a recipe I found on the German cooking website http://www.kochbar.de/. It is the best translation from German to English I could manage, but I think it is reasonably accurate.

Weißer Glühwein (Mulled White Wine)

Ingredients:

  • 600 ml dry white wine
  • 150 ml Vodka
  • One orange
  • Five cloves
  • Two cinnamon sticks
  • Half teaspoon cardamom seeds
  • Three tablespoons of honey
  • Freshly grated nutmeg to taste
  • Lemon slices, to serve.

Slice the orange and throw into a saucepan along with all the other ingredients. Cover and heat gently but do not boil for at least ten minutes (if you boil it you will evaporate off the alcohol and we don’t want that now do we?). Taste and add more honey if necessary. Serve hot in heat-resistant glasses garnished with a light sprinkling of cinnamon, one clove and a slice of lemon.

Please note this is just one variation on a theme – the aforementioned website has numerous other recipes for mulled white wine, so feel free to experiment to come up with different spice and citrus combinations to make your own personalised Christmas drink!

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