Zeller Lange Tafel (Zell Long Table)

On Saturday 20th July from 11am, the 2018 Zell Long Table (”Zeller Lange Tafel”) kicks off.

As the name suggests, a 400 metre long table runs the entire length of Balduinstraße (which is the main shopping street of the town) at which local cafes, bars, restaurants and even shops serve up various food specialities and of course copious amounts of local wine.

A host of events take place throughout the day. Of course, most will be in German, but the people are friendly and the atmosphere is great. The programme is as follows:

11am – Official opening.

12am – Tour for children followed by spaghetti making and painting competition. Meeting point is the Schwartze Katz fountain. Ends at around 2pm.

5pm & 7pm – Performances of the play ”Zeller Schwarze Katz” by the laymen of the town hall. The play (in German but still entertaining) tells the story of how the town’s wine was named.

10pm – Lantern walk and cellar tour of the Zeller Kelterhaus. Meeting point at the Schwartze Katz fountain.

There will also be live and disco music.

Knight’s Meal at Reichsburg, Cochem

The impressive Reichsburg medieval fortress in Cochem has several activities over the year, one of the most popular being the Knight’s Meal.

As the name suggests, you are served medieval style food by people in costume from the period, and the entertainment also harks from that era. Of course, meat features on the menu, but vegetarians are not forgotten as a meatless version of the meal is available.

The event takes place several times a month and most are in German with English translation sheets provided. They do hold a limited number in English, the next being on Saturday 1st September 2018 and one on Friday 21st September 2018.

The meal lasts around four hours and costs €49 for adults and €24.50 for children aged 6 to 17 years. Be prepared to share a table with others – not only is that very medieval, but it is also common in parts of Germany and does make for a very social experience.

Reservation is essential as the event sells out quickly. Full details including a menu, availability chart and booking form are available here.

 

Holiday Apartments and Italian Restaurant in Zell

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Personally I have not stayed in these apartments but they come highly recommended by a good friend, and judging by the website (link on my Useful Addresses page) they look very stylish and comfortable indeed. Sadly the website (which is here) is only in German but the young owners do speak several languages including German, Italian and English.

I have tried their Italian restaurant and the food was extremely good, being cooked by Giovanni, a native Italian, himself. Booking is advised as it can get quite busy.

German Food versus British Food

DinnerFor those foodies out there, the Local (an online newspaper) ran an article pitching several well known British dishes against their German counterparts. It was a close match, but the Brit nosh won the game 7 to 6.

Personally speaking, I think Shepherds Pie beats Sauerbraten hands down. Also the Käsespätzle versus Cheese on Toast was a bit of a home goal, especially if the latter has a dollop of Branston Pickle on it! And don’t even get me started on the numerous merits of the great British fry up!

You can see the full article by clicking here. How do you find German food compared to food from your home country?

Mosel Regional Cuisine – Winzerteller

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People often ask me what typical regional cuisine is in the Mosel valley, but it is a very hard question to answer. What does seem to pop up regularly on menus in the eateries along the river is the “Winzerteller” which literally translates to “Vintner’s plate”. It’s not unique to the region, as I know such things are popular in other states such as Bavaria (where it is called “Brotzeit”), but it is the perfect accompaniment to the local Riesling wine.

As you can see, it is basically just a wooden platter with a selection of meats, cheese or both. The meats usually include cured ham and sliced sausage – often homemade – such as black pudding (“Blutwurst”) and liver sausage “Leberwurst”).

The platter in the picture is from a restaurant in Zell (I will publish the name when I remember it!) and includes cured ham and sausage made from local wild boar (“Wildschwein”). It is one of my favourite meals.

Germany and Vegetarianism?

One thing that struck me when I first came to Germany was that it is not exactly a safe haven for vegetarians.

Pork features in so many dishes including the humble fried potato, and non-meat eaters choices are severely limited given menus usually only offer huge slabs of animal fried in fat from another.

So I had to laugh when I read this article in The Local. Given what is illustrated in that, I am now really grateful I am a meat eater!

Adult Ice Cream

Ice cream as we all know comes in a dazzling array of flavours ranging from the traditional through the exotic to the downright weird. However, on a trip to Cochem I tried ice cream – made from local wine.

Initially I expected it to be just wine flavoured ice cream, but the first lick proved it indeed was made from the real thing and four scoops later I honestly could feel the effects! Maybe that was just a placebo effect, as surely ice cream cannot be alcoholic?

Anyway, all I can say is if you have a sweet tooth and love refreshing ice cream as opposed to the rich creamy varieties, get yourself over to Cochem and give it a try. Unfortunately I did not get the name of the particular parlour where I had it, but it was right in the historic centre and I saw other places selling it. You can probably get it in other towns along the river too, although I have struggled to find it in Zell.

Dining with dogs (Reblogged from Spoonfuls of Germany)

It was not the response I expected: Years ago when I still lived in Germany, I took a Canadian friend who was visiting me in Frankfurt to a restaurant highly regarded for its German cuisine. I was glad I had made a reservation, it was Sunday evening and the restaurant was packed. My Canadian friend, […]

http://spoonfulsofgermany.com/2015/08/20/dining-with-dogs/

Please note this is a reblog from Spoonfuls of Germany, which is a great site and I do recommend you check it out.

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